Posts in Did You Know
Climb Aboard our Marine Science & Sailing Classroom, with Seabury!

Come along with us on 4-day adventure with the February 2019 Seabury Winterim! With squid dissections, sailing lessons, coral surveys, and more, the Trilogy team helped to deliver a week of learning and adventure for these bright-eyed students that is sure to be a fabulous memory for years to come.

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Sharks!

Every year, Discovery Channel fans count down the days until the coveted SHARK WEEK begins. Though the Discovery Channel does show the terrifying strength of these cartilaginous fish, it also does a lot to recognize the importance of sharks in the marine ecosystem. Many people consider sharks as evil, frightening, large, scary creatures however, it is important to  realize how vital sharks are to us.

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It's Turtle Time in Hawai'i

Get ready to fill your mind with all things turtle! Dive in and learn the ins & outs of our two most common species of sea turtles here in Hawai’i - the Green Sea Turtle (honu) and the Hawksbill (honu’ea). Summer is turtle season!

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8 Facts About Humpback Whales You Probably Never Knew

Today, research suggests that up to 12,000 whales could potentially visit Hawaii each winter—which is astounding progress from the dire figures a little over 40 years ago. What's more, is that in addition to the increase in numbers themselves, researchers have been able to learn valuable information about our favorite winter visitors.

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Are there sharks here? Yes, they live in the ocean.

As the catamaran approaches Molokini crater and I peer down into the crystal clear turquoise water I tell the guests, “This is going to be a great day for snorkeling”. Questions about fish, coral, and marine life start to be asked and inevitably someone will ask, “Are there sharks here”? My response is always, “Yes, they live in the ocean”.

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Life of a Spinner Dolphin

As the sun sinks below the horizon and Earth enters into the golden corpuscular hour, groups of spinner dolphins make their way offshore into deep, dark blue water up to 1,000ft. They are on the hunt for prey. Working together in large groups they use clicks, squeaks, and echolocation to communicate with each other to find food.

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Hōkūleʻa- “Star of Gladness”

This summer has brought a lot of excitement to the Hawaiian Islands with the recent return of Hokuea. The Hōkūleʻa is a replica of the traditional Polynesian voyaging canoes. She was first launched in March 1975. In 1976 she made her maiden voyage to Tahiti departing from Honolua Bay in Hawaii and returned. This voyage was completed exclusively using Polynesian voyaging techniques, such as star mapping, wind and weather, cloud formations, movement of currents, wave patterns, and the flight of birds.

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Humpbacks Are Back, Alright!

One thing is certain on our daily whale watches from Lahaina, Ka‘anapali and Ma‘alaea: The humpbacks are back. For islanders, it’s our indicator that the winter season has begun when our gentle giants return to the waters of their birth and for visitors, it’s a once in a lifetime experience observing these marine mammals in our crystal clear waters, wild and free.

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Maps In The Stars: How Polynesians Used Celestial Navigation To Become The World's Best Explorers

Here's a question for all of our diehard history and geography buffs out there: What do modern-day Russia, Colonial Spain, the British Empire, the Mongol Empire, and Polynesia all have in common?

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