Hōkūleʻa- “Star of Gladness”

Hōkūleʻa- “Star of Gladness”

This summer has brought a lot of excitement to the Hawaiian Islands with the recent return of Hokuea. The Hōkūleʻa is a replica of the traditional Polynesian voyaging canoes. She was first launched in March 1975. In 1976 she made her maiden voyage to Tahiti departing from Honolua Bay in Hawaii and returned. This voyage was completed exclusively using Polynesian voyaging techniques, such as star mapping, wind and weather, cloud formations, movement of currents, wave patterns, and the flight of birds.

Coral Health with EOR and the Westin Nanea Ocean Villas

With the start of the fall season, Trilogy is back to hosting floating workshops and reef cleanups. For the month of September, Trilogy hosted the non-profit Eyes of the Reef (EOR) for a workshop on coral health. The corporate sponsor was the Westin Nanea Ocean Villas and the food was provided by Trilogy Excursions.

Life of a Spinner Dolphin

Life of a Spinner Dolphin

As the sun sinks below the horizon and Earth enters into the golden corpuscular hour, groups of spinner dolphins make their way offshore into deep, dark blue water up to 1,000ft. They are on the hunt for prey. Working together in large groups they use clicks, squeaks, and echolocation to communicate with each other to find food.

Living a plastic free life . . .or trying to at least

Living a plastic free life . . .or trying to at least

Take a moment and think about all of the products you use or buy in one day. Now count the ones that are made of plastic or have a plastic component. Almost everything we use on a daily basis is composed of plastic. Plastic has become the product of our lives. Polyethylene, one of the most used plastics today was created in 1898.

Getting Dirty in the Waikamoi Preserve

Getting Dirty in the Waikamoi Preserve

Waikamoi Preserve provides an important sanctuary for hundreds of native Hawaiian plants and animals. It’s high elevation rain forest and alpine shrubland are home to 12 different native bird species, seven of them are endangered. The preserve shelters a large variety of native ferns, herbs, shrubs and trees that reflect the biodiversity of Maui. Many are rare plants unique to East Maui, including members of the Lobelia and Geranium families.

May 2017 Blue'Aina Reef Cleanup

May 2017 Blue'Aina Reef Cleanup

On May 7th, Trilogy was happy to host a sold out Blue’Aina reef cleanup with Corporate Sponsor Aloha Kayaks Maui supporting non-profit Hawaiian Islands Land Trust (HILT). This month our beautiful spring weather allowed us to head up to Cliff House for our underwater reef cleanup. Cliff House is located at Namalu Bay in Kapalua. This bay is a popular spot for locals to cliff jump and swim in the shallow protected waters. Blue’Aina had not been to Cliff House in a few months so we were anticipating a good amount of trash and fishing line.

Trilogy III Discover Ka'anapali

Trilogy III Discover Ka'anapali

A voyage to Molokaʻi is extremely rare due to wind and wave conditions in the channel between the two islands. Every now and then, however, perhaps once a year, the wind and waves settle down enough to make the trek. Right away it was easy to see how this was a mini Molokini; crescent in shape, but teeming with marine life. 

BlueʻAina Earth Day Reef Cleanup Heads to Lanaʻi

BlueʻAina Earth Day Reef Cleanup Heads to Lanaʻi

Hosting a cleanup on Earth Day is a long-standing tradition for Trilogyʻs BlueʻAina Campaign. The Fairmont Kea Lani has been a Blue’Aina supporter for five years now and requests the Earth Day cleanup every year.

BlueʻAina Partners with West Maui Ridge to Reef Initiative

BlueʻAina Partners with West Maui Ridge to Reef Initiative

Chemicals from the roadway, parking lots, and houses all run into the drainage way and down to into the ocean. Strategically planting certain plants along the slopes of the drainage aids in removing nutrients and controlling erosion.

Are there sharks here? Yes, they live in the ocean.

Are there sharks here? Yes, they live in the ocean.

As the catamaran approaches Molokini crater and I peer down into the crystal clear turquoise water I tell the guests, “This is going to be a great day for snorkeling”. Questions about fish, coral, and marine life start to be asked and inevitably someone will ask, “Are there sharks here”? My response is always, “Yes, they live in the ocean”.

The Most Wonderful Time of the Year: Whale Season

The Most Wonderful Time of the Year: Whale Season

Maui has experienced one of the best Whale Seasons to date this year! Enjoy this aerial footage of humpback whales including mother and calf cruising around Olowalu, HI.

8 Facts About Humpback Whales You Probably Never Knew

8 Facts About Humpback Whales You Probably Never Knew

Today, research suggests that up to 12,000 whales could potentially visit Hawaii each winter—which is astounding progress from the dire figures a little over 40 years ago. What's more, is that in addition to the increase in numbers themselves, researchers have been able to learn valuable information about our favorite winter visitors.

Thar She Blows! An Intro To Common Whale Behavior On Maui Whale Watching Tours

WE GOT MUGGED! Watch to the end as a humpback whale makes a spy hop to check out our boat yesterday. An unforgettable experience for all! Trilogy boats do not approach whales within 100 yards, however, whales are curious animals that occasionally come up to check us out.

Whale season in Maui is finally upon us, and our Maui whale watching tours are reporting amazing sightings on every trip that heads out. While we can always guarantee humpback sightings during our whale watching tours in Maui, no two tours over the course of the season are ever completely the same. Even if you've been on a whale watch before, or dozens over the course of your lifetime, there is always the chance that taking one more tour could offer a new experience.

When whale watching in Maui,  it isn't the total number of whales that's really very important. Instead, it's what those whales are doing that can make the difference in a whale watch. After all, what would you rather see during a Maui whale watching tour? An ocean full of whales which are just logging at the surface, or a handful of whales which are breaching, pec slapping, spyhopping, and peduncle-throwing their way across the ocean? Humpbacks are known as the most acrobatic of all the world's whale species, and if you can't quite name all the "moves" that humpbacks have in their repertoire, here is a guide which you can use to decipher the most common humpback maneuvers.

Tail Slap

A whale tail hello! Enjoy a tail slap. . ***This video was taken following Dolphin SMART's criteria for responsible wildlife viewing. For more info, check out: http://bit.ly/2hh7mPI *** . . Follow Us: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/trilogyexcu... Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Sail.Trilogy/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sailtrilogy/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/SailTrilogy Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/trilogymaui/

Vigorous tail slapping is one of the easiest maneuvers to spot on a Maui whale watching tour. Striking the water with their powerful flukes, a whale will repeatedly splash against the water anywhere from 3-30 times.

Peduncle Wave

Lisa Graham pec wave watermark border
Lisa Graham pec wave watermark border

Photo Credit: Island Dream Productions

Despite being the world's 5th largest whale, humpback whales have the largest fin of any animal in the sea (even longer than the fin of a blue whale, whose short fins are similar to a T-Rex dinosaur with short, stumpy arms). More than just being long, the pectoral fin is also incredibly agile, and it's what helps the humpbacks with their aerial maneuvers and ability to twist through the water. Sometimes a whale will wave its pectoral fin, while other times it will repeatedly strike it against the surface of the water.

Spy Hop

Photo Credit: Captain Katie

Not seen as often as a pec wave or a tail slap, a spy hop is when a whale will poke straight out of the water to scan what's happening above the surface. Humpback whales have just as good vision above water as they do below water, and here a very inquisitive humpback spy hops to check us out.

Peduncle Throw

MindsEye_PJ on Flickr

While not entirely as common as a breach, a peduncle throw is an aggressive maneuver where a humpback whale will throw the latter half of its body out of the water. The peduncle muscle that comprises the back third of the whale's body is the largest muscle in the animal kingdom, and it's the driving force behind explosive maneuvers such as breaches and peduncle throws like this one.

Head Lunge

Whale watching in Maui

Photo Credit: Island Dream Productions

A head lunge is somewhat like a big belly flop, where a whale will rise about a third of the way out of the water and then splash back down to the surface. This behavior is most commonly seen in large competition pods, where groups of males who are competing for a female will lunge and splash at each other. Here, a large whales prepares for a lunge off the southern coastline of Lana'i.

Logging

Photo Credit: Trilogy Excursions

Logging is a term which refers to when a whale is floating just beneath the surface. With only their blowholes and peduncle fin breaking the surface of the water, it's almost as if they're sunbathing for a moment or taking a relaxing nap. You'll often see logging when there is a large mother who nursing a newborn calf, or after an extended series of breaches when the whale simply needs to rest.

Sounding Dive

Photo Credit: Trilogy Excursions

Adult humpbacks can hold their breath for up to 45 minutes, and you know that a whale is taking an extended dive when you see the tail flukes go vertical. The good news about a sounding dive is that it makes for a nice photo opportunity (and the chance to see the pattern on the bottom of the flukes), but it also usually means the whale is waving goodbye for a while.

Swimming Inverted

Derek Klein watermark border
Derek Klein watermark border

Photo Credit: T Derek Klein

Every year there are a couple of whale watching tours where we are treated to a special show. Sometimes whales will approach the boat when we are completely stopped in the water, and they will swim around the boat in circles and even swim upside down. This is what's known as being "mugged" by a whale, because there is nothing we can do to move the boat until the whale decides to leave. Here you can see the white underbelly of a whale which is swimming completely inverted.

Breach

Surprise!! A rare video capture on our way back from Lana'i. Vid cred: Nancy from Texas, who was on the right boat at the right time. ***This video was taken following Dolphin SMART's criteria for responsible wildlife viewing. For more info, check out: http://bit.ly/2hh7mPI *** . . Follow Us: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/trilogyexcu...

Without a doubt the full breach is everyone's favorite move, and there are few words to describe the sense of awe of watching a 40-ton animal jump. With little to no warning, these powerful animals will propel themselves out of the water with only 2-3 flaps of their flukes. For an adult humpback, this can mean lifting 90,000-100,000 pounds completely out of the water. While we don't know the exact reasons that humpbacks choose to breach, theories range from sloughing off barnacles and working out their tail muscles to trying to look around. The most commonly agreed upon theory, however, is that humpback whales perform dramatic breaches simply because they can.

Of course, the only thing better than a full breach in front of the the boat is the rarely seen, rarely photographed...

Double Breach!

Double Breach on a whale watch in Maui

Photo Credit: Trilogy Excursions

Do you have photos of a good whale move in Maui? Send us photos on our Facebook page, or come and join us for a whale watching tour during the exciting whale season in Maui. Have any questions about whales in Maui? Leave us a question in the comments below and we'll be more than happy to reply!

About 200 nautical miles (nm) west of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico

About 200 nautical miles (nm) west of Cabo San Lucas, Mexico

We are very glad to be sailing again as that's what this boat and crew love best. We were under motor power for about 16 hours, but the wind has increased and we are now with full sail and using one engine to assist ie motor sailing.